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Bat Cave Review

Bat Cave Review

Horseshoe and Roundleaf Bats
Horseshoe and Roundleaf Bats

I know, it came as a shock to me too. Bruce Wayne doesn’t live in Gotham! Yes, the Bat Cave is in Pokhara. Who would’ve known? The Bat Cave is by far my favorite and the sketchiest cave I’ve been to in Pokhara. It is fun, exhilarating, dangerous, and there are bats! Hang from the ceiling with me as I explore this cave and give you a detailed review.

This way to the Bat Cave
This way to the Bat Cave

About Bat Cave

Bat Cave cavern
Bat Cave cavern

The Bat Cate is a karst limestone cave formed in the Pleistocene era about 2.5 million years ago.  The inside of the cave does not have any lighting, so bring your flash light.  You will receive a mandatory guide when you buy your entrance ticket. He comes with a light, but its nice to have your own. The cave is about 720 feet long and incredibly vast.

There are 2 main caverns in the cave. The second cavern has bats in it and has a secret passage to the outside. I do not recommend taking this passage tough. It is dangerous and risky. The bats can be found in the cave from mid-September to mid-May. The bats that are found in the cave are round leaf, and horseshoe bats.

How to get to the Bat Cave

The Bat Cave is located about 40 minutes away and 6 miles north east of Lakeside, Pokhara.  It is in Batulechcour, which is a 15-minute walk from Mahendra Cave. You can take a bus or taxi to Mahendra Cave then walk for 15 minutes up the road to Bat Cave.

Entrance fee

Bat Cave ticket booth
Bat Cave ticket booth

Nepali citizens: $0.5
SARRC nationals: $0.8
All other foreginers: $1.5

Exploring the Cave

Bat Cave enterance
Bat Cave enterance

My guide and I descended a long walk way and stairs into the cave. I was surprised about how dark it was just a few feet inside the cave. I was glad he had a flashlight but was a little upset about his constant talking.  When I’m someplace new, I like to experience it in its fullness without distractions.

The first cavern we came to was just a dark room with very little going on. We were joined by a few Nepali women who were exploring by the light of their phones. We walked further ahead, and the bats were in full chorus. The chirps reminded me of dolphins. It was cool.

Next, we ascended a very slippery rock face. This part was extremely dangerous. There was a guard rail, but it wasn’t secured to the rocks, it was only resting on the rocks. We then started climbing. Now we are 30 feet above the ground, no ropes, no safe guards, and on a slippery rock face.

One last push and I was squeezing my way through the narrowest of openings. I was happy to be back on solid ground.

I found out later that most people normally exit the cave from the entrance.

Bat Cave exit
Bat Cave exit

Warning:

If you are claustrophobic, acrophobic / afraid of heights, or do not have any climbing skills do not try to exit out of the exit.  Exit out of the entrance.

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